NPI Lookup
NPI Lookup from the NPI Registry — National Provider Identifier Database

NPI Lookup Respiratory, Developmental, Rehab & Restorative Service Providers

A provider who is trained and educated to perform services related to respiratory care, physical therapy, occupational therapy, developmental therapy, rehabilitation and restorative services and may be licensed, certified or practice within the scope of training.


A

Anaplastologist

An anaplastologist is a professional who creates prostheses for the face and body. Patients treated include those missing anatomy due to cancer, traumatic injury, or birth differences. Generally, there are no state licensing requirements for anaplastologists. Certification specific to anaplastology is provided through the Board for Certified Clinical Anaplastology (BCCA) with a credential title of Certified Clinical Anaplastologist (CCA).

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A

Art Therapist

(1) An individual who uses art to achieve the therapeutic goals of symptom relief, emotional integration, and recovery from or adjustment to illness or disability. (2) An art therapist uses a form of treatment that enables patients with mental or physical disabilities to use art as a way of expressing and dealing with feelings and inner conflicts. (3) An individual who uses arts modalities and creative processes during intentional intervention in therapeutic, rehabilitative, community, or educational settings to foster health, communication, and expression; promote the integration of physical, emotional, cognitive, and social functioning; enhance self-awareness; and facilitate change.

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C

Clinical Exercise Physiologist

A Clinical Exercise Physiologist is a health care professional who is trained to work with patients with chronic disease where exercise training has been shown to be of therapeutic benefit, including but not limited to cardiovascular and pulmonary disease, and metabolic disorders.

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D

Dance Therapist

The dance therapist, sometimes called a movement therapist, focuses on rhythmic body movements as a medium of physical and psychological change. Dance therapy is practiced more often with mental health patients than with physically disabled patients. A master?s degree is required by the American Dance Therapy Association to award the credentials Dance Therapist Registered (DTR).

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D

Developmental Therapist

A Developmental Therapist is a person qualified by completion of an approved program in Developmental Therapy and where applicable credentialed by the state and practicing within the scope of the credential, or credentialed by completion of education experiences as approved by the state and practicing within the scope of that credential or, where state credentialing does not exist, certified by the Board of the Developmental Therapy Association. A developmental therapist evaluates children's global development in order to identify areas of developmental delay whether arising from physiological, neurological, or environmental factors, or a combination of factors; and designs, implements, and modifies therapeutic interventions for the child and the family to promote the child's acquisition of skills in a variety of developmental areas, including cognitive processes and social interaction in order to maximize functional independence and developmental homeostasis, and improve the quality of life at home and in the community; and provides consultation for the parents and other professionals working with the family on global development.

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K

Kinesiotherapist

A provider trained and educated in the applied science of medically prescribed therapeutic exercise, education and adapted physical activities designed to improve the quality of line and health of adults and children by developing physical fitness, increasing mobility and independence, and improving psychosocial behavior. The kinesiotherapist seeks a coach-player relationship in which he/she helps the patient/client reach the goal of becoming an independent, self-sustaining person. Kinesiotherapists, as compared with physical therapists, put more emphasis on geriatric care, reconditioning and fitness, and psychiatric care. A large percentage of kinesiotherapists practice in Veterans Administration hospitals.

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M

Massage Therapist

An individual trained in the manipulation of tissues (as by rubbing, stroking, kneading, or tapping) with the hand or an instrument for remedial or hygienic purposes.

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M

Mastectomy Fitter

An individual trained in the fitting and adjusting of breast prostheses and management of post-mastectomy prostheses services.

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M

Music Therapist

The music therapist works with patients with a broad variety of diagnoses and therapeutic goals. The interventions may involve musical performance with instruments, voice or body movements; listening to music; or attending musical events.

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O

Occupational Therapist

An occupational therapist is a person who has graduated from an entry-level occupational therapy program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) or predecessor organizations, or approved by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT), or an equivalent international occupational therapy education program; has successfully completed a period of supervised fieldwork experience required by the occupational therapy program; has passed a nationally recognized entry-level examination for occupational therapists, and fulfills state requirements for licensure, certification, or registration. An occupational therapist provides interventions based on evaluation and which emphasize the therapeutic use of everyday life activities (i.e., occupations) with individuals or groups for the purpose of facilitating participation in roles and situations and in home, school, workplace, community and other settings. Occupational therapy services are provided for the purpose of promoting health and wellness and are provided to those who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction. Occupational therapists address the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory, and other aspects of occupational performance in a variety of contexts to support engagement in everyday life activities that affect health, well-being, and quality of life.

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  • Driving and Community Mobility

    Occupational therapists can optimize and prolong an older driver?s ability to drive safely and ease the transition to other forms of transportation if driving cessation becomes necessary. By identifying strengths as well as physical or cognitive challenges, occupational therapists can evaluate an individual?s overall ability to operate a vehicle safely and recommend assistive devices or behavioral changes to limit risks. Occupational therapy practitioners offer a continuum of services related to community mobility, from evaluation of driving performance, through counseling and support for lifestyle changes, to maintaining independence and quality of life.

  • Environmental Modification

    Occupational therapy practitioners are experts at identifying the cause of difficulties in performance of activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living. Occupational therapy practitioners evaluate the client, their environment, and their occupational performance in that environment, as well as make recommendations for products to improve the fit between the client, place, and activity. Occupational therapists can evaluate both the skills of the client and the environmental features that support or limit the performance of meaningful or necessary activities, thereby enhancing health, safety and well-being. Based on this assessment, they recommend modification and intervention strategies that improve the fit between the person and his or her environment.

  • Ergonomics

  • Feeding, Eating & Swallowing

    Occupational therapists provide interventions to clients of all ages with feeding, eating and swallowing difficulties. Occupational therapists provide comprehensive rehabilitative, habilitative, and palliative dysphagia care, which includes collaborating with clients to provide individualized compensatory swallowing strategies, modified diet textures, adapted mealtime environments, enhanced feeding skills, preparatory exercises and positioning to clients, reinforcement of mealtime strategies to enhance and improve swallowing skills, and training to caregivers to enhance eating and feeding performance. Occupational therapists provide screening and in-depth clinical assessment which may include instrumental dysphagia assessments including videofluroscopy.

  • Gerontology

    Occupational therapists work with older adults in virtually every setting: assisted living, wellness programs, hospitals, nursing homes, senior centers, clinics and in the home. Occupational therapists bring an understanding of the importance of participation and occupation for overall well-being to those who are experiencing disabling conditions related to aging. The primary overarching goal of occupational therapy services with this population is to maximize independence and participation, thereby enabling an older person to continue to live successfully in his or her chosen environment. Occupational therapists can help older adults by developing strategies to help or maintain safety and well-being, to assist with life transitions, and to compensate for challenges they experience in activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, leisure participation, social participation, and productive activities.

  • Hand

  • Human Factors

  • Low Vision

    Occupational therapists enable children and adults with visual impairment to engage in their chosen daily living activities safely and as independently as possible. This is accomplished by 1) teaching the person to use their remaining vision as efficiently as possible to complete activities; (2) modifying activities so that they can be completed with less vision; (3) training the person in use of adaptive equipment to compensate for vision loss, including high and low technology assistive devices; and (4) modifying the person?s environment.

  • Mental Health

    Occupational therapists provide treatment for people recovering from a mental or physical illness to regain their independence and stability and to engage in normal daily occupations (work, home, family life, school, leisure). Occupational therapists provide particular emphasis on interventions that result in improved quality of life and decrease hospitalization.

  • Neurorehabilitation

  • Pediatrics

    Occupational therapists provide services to infants, toddlers and children who have or who are at risk for developmental delays or disabilities. Occupational therapy is concerned with a child's ability to participate in daily life activities or "occupations." Occupational therapists use their unique expertise to help children with social-emotional, physical, cognitive, communication, and adaptive behavioral challenges and to help children to be prepared for and perform important learning and school-related activities and to fulfill their rule as students. Through an understanding of the impact of disability, illness, and impairment on a child's development, plan, ability to learn new skills, and overall occupational performance, occupational therapists design interventions that promote healthy development, establish needed skills, and/or modify environments, all in support of participation in daily activities.

  • Physical Rehabilitation

    Occupational therapists are experts at helping people lead as independent a life as possible. Occupational therapists bring an understanding of the physical and psychological implications of illness and injury and their effects on peoples' ability to perform the tasks of daily living. Occupational therapists provide interventions that can aide a person in completing ADL and IADL tasks, such as dressing, bathing, preparing meals, and driving. They also may fabricate custom orthotics to improve function, evaluate the environment for safety hazards and recommend adaptations to remove those hazards, help a person compensate for cognitive changes, and build a persons? physical endurance and strength. Occupational therapists' knowledge of adapting tasks and modifying the environment to compensate for functional limitations is used to increase the involvement of clients and to promote safety and success.

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O

Occupational Therapy Assistant

An occupational therapy assistant is a person who has graduated from an occupational therapy assistant program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) or predecessor organizations, has successfully completed a period of supervised fieldwork experience required by the accredited occupational therapy assistant program, has passed a nationally recognized entry-level examination for occupational therapy assistants, and fulfills state requirements for licensure, certification, or registration. An occupational therapy assistant provides interventions under the supervision of an occupational therapist which emphasize the therapeutic use of everyday life activities (i.e., occupations) with individuals or groups for the purpose of facilitating participation in roles and situations and in home, school, workplace, community and other settings. Occupational therapy services are provided for the purpose of promoting health and wellness and are provided to those who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction. Occupational therapy assistants address the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory, and other aspects of occupational performance in a variety of contexts to support engagement in everyday life activities that affect health, well-being, and quality of life.

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  • Driving & Community Mobility

    Occupational therapy assistants contribute to the completion of an individualized occupational therapy driving and community mobility evaluation by administering delegated assessments and identifying findings that impact the client's occupational performance. Clients engage in the assessment and occupational profile process to customize the evaluation to their individual driving and community mobility needs. Occupational therapy assistants administer and continuously modify individualized in-vehicle and community mobility assessments within the naturalistic context of the community in response to the occupational performance and safety behaviors of the client. They also implement an individualized intervention plan, within the parameters established in collaboration with the occupational therapist that reflects the contexts of the client and meets his or her occupational performance and safety needs. Occupational therapy assistants address immediate and long-term implications of psychosocial issues related to compromised driving and community mobility throughout the occupational therapy process and makes recommendations to the occupational therapist for modification to service delivery.

  • Environmental Modification

    Occupational therapy assistants provide environmental modifications under the supervision of an occupational therapist. OTAs develop and implement an individualized occupational therapy environmental modification plan that reflects the relevant contexts of the client and relevant others and maximizes current and future occupational performance, safety, and participation of the client. Clients receive environmental modification recommendations and interventions that enable them to meet occupational performance and participation goals and that have adequate flexibility to accommodate for their future needs.

  • Feeding, Eating & Swallowing

    Occupational therapy assistants provide environmental modifications under the supervision of an occupational therapist. OTAs develop and implement an individualized occupational therapy environmental modification plan that reflects the relevant contexts of the client and relevant others and maximizes current and future occupational performance, safety, and participation of the client. Clients receive environmental modification recommendations and interventions that enable them to meet occupational performance and participation goals and that have adequate flexibility to accommodate for their future needs.

  • Low Vision

    Occupational therapy assistants contribute to the completion of an individualized occupational therapy low-vision evaluation under the direction and supervision of the occupational therapist to identify factors that may facilitate, compensate for, or inhibit use of vision in occupational performance. Clients are engaged in the identification of strengths, limitations, and goals as they relate to low vision to optimize independence and participation in desired occupations. Occupational therapy assistants also contribute to the development and implementation of an individualized occupational therapy low-vision intervention plan in collaboration with the occupational therapist, client, and relevant others that reflects the client?s priorities for occupational performance.

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O

Orthotics/Prosthetics Fitter

(1) An individual who, under the guidance of and in consultation with the orthotist/prosthetist, fabricates orthotics/prosthetics in such a manner as to provide maximum fit, function, cosmesis and workmanship. (2) An individual who, under the direction of a orthotist/prothetist, follows prescriptions and specifications to determine a device, such as a brace, to be made and the materials and tools needed to make the device. A technician then develops the devices.

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O

Orthotist

An individual skilled in the practice, making, use and application to individual cases of an orthopedic appliance or apparatus used to support, align, prevent or correct deformities or to improve the function of movable parts of the body.

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P

Pedorthist

An individual who is trained in the management and treatment of conditions of the foot, ankle, and lower extremities requiring fitting, fabricating, and adjusting of pedorthic devices.

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P

Physical Therapist

(1) Physical therapists are health care professionals who evaluate and treat people with health problems resulting from injury or disease. PT?s assess joint motion, muscle strength and endurance, function of heart and lungs, and performance of activities required in daily living, among other responsibilities. Treatment includes therapeutic exercises, cardiovascular endurance training, and training in activities of daily living. (2) A physical therapist is a person qualified by an accredited program in physical therapy, licensed by the state, and practicing within the scope of that license. Physical therapists treat disease, injury, or loss of a bodily part by physical means, such as the application of light, heat, cold, water, electricity, massage and exercise. They develop treatment plans based upon each patient?s strengths, weaknesses, range of motion and ability to function. (3) A health professional who specializes in physical therapy- the health care field concerned primarily with the treatment of disorders with physical agents and methods, such as massage, manipulation, therapeutic exercises, cold, heat (including short-wave, microwave, and ultrasonic diathermy), hydrotherapy, electric stimulation and light to assist in rehabilitating patients and in restoring normal function after an illness or injury.

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P

Physical Therapy Assistant

(1)Physical therapist assistants are skilled health care providers who are graduates of a physical therapist assistant associate degree program accredited by an agency recognized by the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education or Council on Postsecondary Accreditation, who assists the physical therapist in providing physical therapy. The supervising physical therapist is directly responsible for the actions of the physical therapist assistant. The PTA performs physical therapy procedures and related tasks that have been selected and delegated by the supervising physical therapist. Duties of the PTA include assisting the physical therapist in implementing treatment programs, training patients in exercised and activities of daily living, conducting treatments, and reporting to the physical therapist on the patient?s responses. In addition to direct patient care, the PTA may also perform such functions as patient transport, and clinic or equipment preparation and maintenance. Currently more than half of all states require PTAs to be licensed, registered or certified. (2) An individual who works under the supervision of a physical therapist to assist him or her in providing physical therapy services. A physical therapy assistant may, for instance, help patients follow an appropriate exercise program that will increase their strength, endurance, coordination, and range of motion and train patients to perform activities of daily life.

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P

Prosthetist

An individual skilled in the practice, making, use, and application to individual cases of an artificial substitute for a missing body part, such as an arm or leg, eye or tooth, used for functional or cosmetic reasons, or both

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P

Pulmonary Function Technologist

An individual who is trained and qualified to perform pulmonary diagnostic tests. In the course of conducting these tests, the Pulmonary Function Technologist is able to setup, calibrate, maintain, and ensure the quality assurance of the pulmonary function testing equipment. In the laboratory, clinical or patient care setting the technologist instructs patients, elicits cooperation, performs procedures, monitors patient response, and evaluates patient performance. Tests results are calculated, compared with predicted normal ranges, and evaluated for reliability. The technologist collects clinical history data and evaluates the clinical implications of the test results.

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R

Recreation Therapist

A recreation therapist uses recreational activities for intervention in some physical, social or emotional behavior to bring about a desired change in that behavior and promote the growth and development of the patient.

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R

Recreational Therapist Assistant

Recreational Therapist Assistants work in support of or assistant to Recreational Therapists treating patients with disabilities, injuries, and illnesses. Recreational Therapist Assistants work in a variety of settings providing treatments using recreational activities, including games, sports, and crafts.

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R

Rehabilitation Counselor

An individual trained and educated in a systematic process of assisting persons with physical, mental, developmental, cognitive, and emotional disabilities to achieve their personal, career, and independent living goals assessment and appraisal, diagnosis and treatment planning, career (vocational) counseling, individual and group counseling interventions for adjustments to the medical and psychosocial impact of disability, case management, program evaluation and research, job analysis and placement counseling, and consultation on rehabilitation resources and technology. Certification generally requires a Master?s degree with specialized courses in rehabilitation processes and technology.

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  • Assistive Technology Practitioner

  • Assistive Technology Supplier

  • Orientation and Mobility Training Provider

    Orientation and Mobility (O&M) specialists teach children and adults who have visual impairments the specific orientation skills used to find one's way in the environment and the mobility skills needed to travel safely and efficiently at home, school, work, and in the community. Instruction is usually provided one-on-one and can include skills such as how to use a long cane, the operation of low vision devices and electronic travel aids when appropriate, how to orient oneself to new environments, navigate public transportation systems, how to cross streets safely, and traveling by using hearing, remaining vision, and other senses.

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R

Rehabilitation Practitioner

A health care practitioner who trains or retrains individuals disabled by disease or injury to help them attain their maximum functional capacity.

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R

Respiratory Therapist, Certified

A Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT) is a an entry level therapist who has passed a standardized written examination administered by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). CRTs provide diagnostic testing, therapeutics, monitoring, rehabilitation, and education to patients with disorders of the cardiopulmonary system. They provide these respiratory care services in all health care facilities and in the home. A CRT is a graduate of an associate degree program approved by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Educational Programs (CAAHEP) and where applicable, is licensed by the state and is practicing within the scope of the license.

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  • Critical Care

    Respiratory emergencies are commonplace in the treatment of critical care patients. Included in the assessment measurements conducted by the respiratory therapist in the critical care settings are arterial blood gas puncture and analysis, intrarterial monitoring, bedside measurements of lung mechanics, hemodynamic monitoring, and inspired and expired gas measurements. This is coupled with the initiation and management of mechanical ventilation patients.

  • Emergency Care

    The immediate availability of diagnostic and therapeutic cardiopulmonary services in the assessment and management of trauma victims, patients requiring airway management and others requiring emergency care.

  • General Care

    This level of care includes diagnostics testing, therapeutics, monitoring, rehabilitation of patients with disorders of the cardiopulmonary system, as well as, education of the patient and family in regard to those disorders.

  • Geriatric Care

    Care of older patients who have age and/or disease related decremental pulmonary changes. Diagnosis and treatment is very important for this group since chronic lung disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality among them. Furthermore, as this segment of the population increases, life expectancy is being extended.

  • Home Care

    Home care fosters individual responsibility for self-management of chronic respiratory conditions. It includes individualized assessment based plans of care service developed to promote safe, proper, and sustained use of prescribed respiratory therapy medications, equipment, and techniques in the home.

  • Neonatal/Pediatrics

    The care and treatment of premature infants, newborns and children. This includes management of mechanical ventilation, assessment, diagnostics and generalized respiratory treatments.

  • Palliative/Hospice

    A coordinated plan of care to help dying patients and their families handle the burden of terminal care. Effective secretion management and relief of dyspnea are paramount in caring for patients with end-stage pulmonary disease.

  • Patient Education

    The focus of patient and family education activities is to promote knowledge of disease process, medical therapy, and self help. Respiratory therapists are uniquely qualified to provide this service in regard to cardiopulmonary diseases and injury.

  • Patient Transport

    Transport respiratory therapist provide patient assessment, initiation of treatment modalities and continued monitoring of patient status of the critically ill and injured patients with special attention to advanced airway and ventilator management. The transport respiratory therapist knowledge and experience with complex neonatal, pediatric and adult patient care issues provides them with an expertise to assist with any patient care issue in a variety of transport modes.

  • Pulmonary Diagnostics

    Included in the area of pulmonary diagnostics are the following; collection and analysis of physiological specimens, interpretation of physiological data, administration of tests of the cardiopulmonary system, and the conduct of both neurophysiological and sleep disorders studies.

  • Pulmonary Function Technologist

    An individual who is trained and qualified to perform pulmonary diagnostic tests. In the course of conducting these tests, the Pulmonary Function Technologist is able to setup, calibrate, maintain, and ensure the quality assurance of the pulmonary function testing equipment. In the laboratory, clinical or patient care setting the technologist instructs patients, elicits cooperation, performs procedures, monitors patient response, and evaluates patient performance. Tests results are calculated, compared with predicted normal ranges, and evaluated for reliability. The technologist collects clinical history data and evaluates the clinical implications of the test results.

  • Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    The respiratory therapist can assist the chronic pulmonary patient in returning to an optimal role in society by providing an effective program. It includes bronchopulmonary drainage, exercise therapy, and patient education.

  • SNF/Subacute Care

    Care of residents in a long-term care environment. Respiratory modalities delivered include those similar in the general care and critical care areas but provided to less critical patients.

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R

Respiratory Therapist, Registered

A Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) is an advanced therapist who has passed standardized written and clinical simulation examinations administered by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). In addition, to the certified therapist (CRT) entry level skills, RRTs have advanced education and training in patient assessment, in the development and modification of patient care plans, and in assuring the appropriate utilization of respiratory care resources. An RRT is a graduate of an associate or baccalaureate degree producing educational programs approved by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) and where applicable, is licensed by the state and is practicing within the scope of that license.

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  • Critical Care

    Respiratory emergencies are commonplace in the treatment of critical care patients. Included in the assessment measurements conducted by the respiratory therapist in the critical care settings are arterial blood gas puncture and analysis, intrarterial monitoring, bedside measurements of lung mechanics, hemodynamic monitoring, and inspired and expired gas measurements. This is coupled with the initiation and management of mechanical ventilation patients.

  • Emergency Care

    The immediate availability of diagnostic and therapeutic cardiopulmonary services in the assessment and management of trauma victims, patients requiring airway management and others requiring emergency care.

  • General Care

    This level of care includes diagnostics testing, therapeutics, monitoring, rehabilitation of patients with disorders of the cardiopulmonary system, as well as, education of the patient and family in regard to those disorders.

  • Geriatric Care

    Care of older patients who have age and/or disease related decremental pulmonary changes. Diagnosis and treatment is very important for this group since chronic lung disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality among them. Furthermore, as this segment of the population increases, life expectancy is being extended.

  • Home Care

    Home care fosters individual responsibility for self-management of chronic respiratory conditions. It includes individualized assessment based plans of care service developed to promote safe, proper, and sustained use of prescribed respiratory therapy medications, equipment, and techniques in the home.

  • Neonatal/Pediatrics

    The care and treatment of premature infants, newborns and children. This includes management of mechanical ventilation, assessment, diagnostics and generalized respiratory treatments.

  • Palliative/Hospice

    A coordinated plan of care to help dying patients and their families handle the burden of terminal care. Effective secretion management and relief of dyspnea are paramount in caring for patients with end-stage pulmonary disease.

  • Patient Education

    The focus of patient and family education activities is to promote knowledge of disease process, medical therapy, and self help. Respiratory therapists are uniquely qualified to provide this service in regard to cardiopulmonary diseases and injury.

  • Patient Transport

    Transport respiratory therapist provide patient assessment, initiation of treatment modalities and continued monitoring of patient status of the critically ill and injured patients with special attention to advanced airway and ventilator management. The transport respiratory therapist knowledge and experience with complex neonatal, pediatric and adult patient care issues provides them with an expertise to assist with any patient care issue in a variety of transport modes.

  • Pulmonary Diagnostics

    Included in the area of pulmonary diagnostics are the following; collection and analysis of physiological specimens, interpretation of physiological data, administration of tests of the cardiopulmonary system, and the conduct of both neurophysiological and sleep disorders studies.

  • Pulmonary Function Technologist

    An individual who is trained and qualified to perform pulmonary diagnostic tests. In the course of conducting these tests, the Pulmonary Function Technologist is able to setup, calibrate, maintain, and ensure the quality assurance of the pulmonary function testing equipment. In the laboratory, clinical or patient care setting the technologist instructs patients, elicits cooperation, performs procedures, monitors patient response, and evaluates patient performance. Tests results are calculated, compared with predicted normal ranges, and evaluated for reliability. The technologist collects clinical history data and evaluates the clinical implications of the test results.

  • Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    The respiratory therapist can assist the chronic pulmonary patient in returning to an optimal role in society by providing an effective program. It includes bronchopulmonary drainage, exercise therapy, and patient education.

  • SNF/Subacute Care

    Care of residents in a long-term care environment. Respiratory modalities delivered include those similar in the general care and critical care areas but provided to less critical patients.

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S

Specialist/Technologist

General classification identifying individuals who are trained on a specific piece of equipment or technical procedure.

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  • Athletic Trainer

    Athletic trainers are allied health care professionals who work in consultation with or under the direction of physicians, and specialize in the prevention, assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries and illnesses. Currently, the entry-level employment requirements are a bachelor?s degree with a major in athletic training from an accredited university or college. A majority of athletic trainers hold advanced degrees. National board certification is generally required as a condition of state licensure and employment. Most states regulate athletic trainers, and they practice within the scope of that license or regulation. Clinical practice includes emergency care, rehabilitation, reconditioning, therapeutic exercise, wellness programs, exercise physiology, kinesiology, biomechanics, nutrition, psychology and health care administration.

  • Rehabilitation, Blind

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